News

U.S.newsCoryanne Hicks, Staff Writer / July 8, 2019 
How Much to Invest for Retirement
If saving for retirement is important to you, it should be the first line item on your budget. Figure out how much you need to save to achieve your retirement goals, then live on whatever is left over.

InvestopediaROGER WOHLNER / Sep 9, 2019
How to Become a 401(k) Millionaire
Becoming a 401(k) millionaire is slow going, not unlike training to run a long-distance race. When you first become eligible to contribute to a 401(k) plan, contribute as much as you can. According to Fidelity, the average 401(k) millionaire contributed to his or her 401(k) for 30-plus years.

InvestopediaAMY FONTINELLE / Sep 9, 2019
How to Set Up a Backdoor Roth IRA
High income earners, who can’t contribute directly to a Roth IRA, may be able to contribute indirectly via a backdoor Roth and maximize their retirement savings.  Roth IRAs are attractive because they don’t have required minimum distributions and the distributions are tax free.

SmartAssetJavier Simon, CEPF®  / Mar 25, 2019 
How Much Are HOA Fees?
If you picture living in a planned community full of amenities and happy neighbors, you’re probably asking yourself: How much are homeowners association fee (HOA fee)? Some studies suggest that you can expect to pay HOA monthly fees between $200 and $300. 

Investopedia JEAN FOLGER / Mar 26, 2019
Is It Possible to Retire at 45 With $500,000?
If you’re like many adults, the thought of taking an early retirement (could you retire at 45?) has probably crossed your mind at least once or twice.

Zacks Sweta Killa / Mar 25, 2019
6 Excellent Dividend Growth Stocks to Buy Now
If The return of volatility with the escalation of global growth concerns and the risk of recession in the United States has raised the appeal for dividend growth stocks. This is because dividend-paying securities are the major sources of consistent income when returns from the equity market are at risk.

InvestopediaAMY BELL  / Mar 15, 2019 
How a Roth IRA Works After Retirement
In recent years, the Roth IRA (individual retirement account) has skyrocketed in popularity with Americans looking to squirrel away a nest egg. A valuable supplement to any retirement portfolio, a Roth IRA accrues earnings on a tax-deferred basis; the earnings are tax-free if you meet certain requirements.

MoneywiseDOUG WHITEMAN / Mar 8, 2019
How to Choose the Right 529 College Savings Plan
When shopping for a 529 account, you’ll need to make a couple of big decisions on your way to selecting a plan. The first is whether to go with an education savings plan or a prepaid tuition plan.

SmartAsset
Javier Simon, CEPF / Mar 15, 2019
The Many Benefits of a 401(k) Plan
If your company offers a 401(k) plan, you’re in luck. These savings vehicles help you save for retirement as you enjoy some tax breaks. This article will explain how they work and all you need to know to start investing in your Golden Years.

GOBankingRatesJoel Anderson  / Mar 7, 2019 
20 Cities Where a $50,000 Salary Goes the Furthest
Earning $50,000 a year is just about average for Americans, with the median income nationwide currently coming in at $57,652. However, it’s important to note that $50,000 is not the same everywhere you go. 

CNBCLucia Mutikani Editing by Paul Simao / Reuters / Mar 8, 2019
US housing starts jump more than expected in January
Housing starts jumped 18.6 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 1.230 million units in January, the Commerce Department said on Friday.

InvestorPlace
James Brumley / Mar 7, 2019
10 High-Yield Monthly Dividend Stocks
Do you ever wish your dividend stocks paid out monthly rather than quarterly? For income-oriented investors who cover their monthly expenses with dividend income, it would certainly be a convenient option.

CNNSandee LaMotte / Feb 28, 2019 
Weekend sleep-in might ruin your waistline and your health, study says
Wake up, America, and raise your hand if you try to repair your exhausted body by sleeping in on weekends.  A new study says the habit may not be such a good idea for your waistline — or your health.

Popular ScienceSara Chodosh / Mar 1, 2019
Some vaccinated adults may not be protected against measles
If you were born prior to 1957, you were born in an era when the measles virus was so prevalent that the Centers for Disease Control considers you to be immune—coming into contact with the disease during your childhood was simply inevitable.

Espresso
Adam Bisby / Feb 27, 2019
Is your phone addiction ruining your life?
Where would you be without your phone? If your mobile usage has led to a phone addiction, you might be better off without it. According to research, you may have a problem if you feel a range of negative emotions, from discomfort to panic, when you can’t use your mobile device.

BestLifeAshley Moor / Jan 31, 2019 
15 Employees Reveal the Real Reasons for Quitting Their Jobs—And What Would’ve Made Them Stay
It’s highly likely that, at some point in your life, you’ll find yourself at a job you just can’t take anymore. In fact, one survey of more than 3,000 Americans revealed that 20 percent of employees believe their work environment is threatening or even hostile.

24/7 Wall StThomas C. Frohlich / Feb 27, 2019
States With the Highest and Lowest Sales Tax
On or before April 15, millions of Americans will file their taxes.  Though the focus this time of year tends to be on income taxes, Americans also pay thousands of dollars each year in state and local sales taxes.  Sales tax rates and sales tax bases, which vary considerably between states, change how much tax revenue state and local governments collect.

Money Talks News
Marilyn Lewis / Feb 27, 2019
7 Painless Ways to Pay Off Your Mortgage Years Earlier
Here’s how to free yourself from your biggest debt faster than you would think possible.  Want to pay off your home and run the mortgage contract through the shredder a lot sooner than you planned?

Yahoo FinanceAdriana Belmonte / Feb 25, 2019 
Jobs with the most openings in each U.S. state
Some job fields are growing particularly quickly in certain U.S. states, and some gigs are in higher demand across the country.  Food preparers had the most job openings in 20 different states, including Utah, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Rhode Island. A formal education generally isn’t required for these positions, and workers earn an average of $10.93 an hour or $22,730 a year.

MoneyWiseDoug Whiteman / Feb 25, 2019
How — and Why — to Put Your Money in CDs
Looking for a risk-free place to park some savings? You could open a garden-variety savings account, but your interest might be microscopic. A high-interest or high-yield savings account is smarter, but an even better option is a certificate of deposit, or CD.

TheStreet
 Bret Kenwell / Jan 2, 2019
3 High-Quality REITs to Buy Right Now
The fourth quarter has been anything but smooth sailing. After most major U.S. stock market indices came into the quarter at or near the highs, they’ve been assaulted by volatility as their prices were hammered.  After putting in a low on Christmas Eve, the S&P 500 has been working on putting in a bottom. However, it still fell almost 15% for the quarter. That’s a tough pill for bulls to swallow and has set up an interesting start to 2019.

MarketWatchDana Anspach / Feb 22, 2019 
Why new tax rules make Roth accounts better than ever
The Tax Cut & Jobs Act lowered marginal tax rates, but, those rates revert to higher levels in 2026. No one knows if this will happen or not. Right now, according to the law, it will. If it does, we may never see tax rates this low again. That means getting money into tax-free vehicles now can turn into a significant boost to your after-tax wealth later.

USA TODAYZlati Meyer / Feb 22, 2019
Is that my bill? Eating out at full-service restaurants is getting more expensive
You may want to make “dinner and a movie” just “a movie.”  Prices at full-service restaurants – eateries with waitstaff, unlike fast-food joints – are on the rise, according to the U.S.  Department of Labor.  Experts point to restaurants’ increased expenses – like labor, rent and insurance – as the reason they’re charging customers more.

CNBC
Maggie Fitzgerald  / Feb 21, 2019
Whole grains can reduce risk of liver cancer by nearly 40 percent, study finds
Primary liver cancer is the sixth most common cancer and the second leading cause of death from cancer worldwide.  A new study demonstrates that a diet with plenty of whole grains can decrease the risk of liver cancer by 37 percent.  Increased intake of fruit or vegetable fiber did not have an effect on liver cancer risk in the study.

Harvard Health PublishingJulie Corliss / Feb 12, 2019 
Planet-friendly, plant-based home cooking
Botanically speaking, legumes are the edible seeds from pods you can split in half. Familiar examples include the wide array of beans — black, fava, garbanzo, kidney, and pinto, to name just a few. Lentils, peas, and peanuts are also legumes.

CNNStarre Vartan  / Jan 30, 2019
Why vacations matter for your health
Unlike every other developed nation in the world, the U.S. has no mandated number of days off for employees. About one-fourth of American workers get no paid vacation at all. Those whose employers offer it receive an average of about 10 days a year. And 54% of American workers didn’t even use the days off they earned, according to Project Time Off.

Popular Science
Nicole Wetsman  / Feb 14, 2019
Here’s why ultra-processed foods are so bad for your health
Increasing the amount of ultra-processed foods that you eat also shortens your life, according to a new study. The research, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, tracked nearly 45,000 French men and women over eight years. It found that for every 10 percent increase in the amount of ultra-processed foods the participates ate, risk of death went up 1 percent.

Yahoo FinanceKristin Myers / Feb 3, 2019 
How the ballooning $22 trillion national debt will affect Americans
The national debt is no longer a problem that can be ignored. According to the Treasury department, the total public debt crossed the $22 trillion mark on Monday, with some $30 billion in debt added this month alone. When President Donald Trump took office, debt stood just over $19.9 trillion.

ForbesSimon Moore  / Feb 14, 2019
Should You Consider A Roth 401(k)?
First off, only about half of employers, mainly large ones, offer Roth 401(k) plans currently, so check if you can access a Roth 401(k) before deep exploration here. However, there are a number of cases where Roth 401(k)s can make sense especially if you’re younger and see your taxes rising in future.

Zacks 
Can I Get Money Back on a Tax Return for What I Paid in Medical Insurance?
If rising medical insurance premiums are lightening your wallet, you might be able to get some of it back when you file your income tax return with one of two different tax deductions. When figuring the deductions, you can’t include the costs for medical insurance that is paid by your employer or reimbursed.

U.S. NewsBeverly Harzog   / Feb 11, 2019 
What Is an Excellent Credit Score?
You might be surprised to hear this, but as of April 2017, the average FICO score was 700. This was the first time the average score reached 700.  But that’s not the only surprise. Would you believe that 20.7 percent of consumers actually have a credit score of more than 800? I think we can all agree that 800 falls within the excellent credit score range since FICO scores go from 300 to 850.

GOBankingRatesBarri Segal  / Feb 11, 2019
Emerging Jobs That Could Make You Big Bucks in the Future
The amount of jobs available today that didn’t exist 30 years ago is almost overwhelming. And as technology improves, these jobs will only become more abundant. With the digital economy in full swing, businesses are also changing how they function. If you’re interested in emerging jobs of the future, you’ve come to the right place.

The Wall Street Journal Glenn Ruffenach | Feb 10, 2019
How Big Must Your Nest Egg Be?
How can I figure out how much money I need to save for retirement? How big does my nest egg need to be?
A good way to think about this is in terms of expenses. At its simplest, a nest egg helps cover your living expenses in later life. With that in mind, the following calculation—courtesy of William Bernstein, an investment adviser and author—can help pinpoint your particular “number” for retirement.

CNBCDr. Shamard Charles  / Feb 6, 2019 
Sedentary lifestyle could increase risk of colorectal cancer in young women
For the first time, a scientific study has identified sedentary behavior as a potential risk factor to explain the sharp rise in colorectal cancer among those under 50.

The Washington PostJill U. Adams / Feb 9, 2019
What you need to know about sleep medications, their side effects and other issues
A lot of people out there don’t get enough sleep — more than 1 in 3 American adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  If you’re one of them, you probably know there are two main treatments for improving sleep: behavioral methods and medications.

KTNV Las VegasCinthia Maldonado | Feb 9, 2019
Spotting the early symptoms of the flu 
LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — The flu season isn’t over and according to medicine physician in Las Vegas, February is part of the peak season.  On Friday, an 11-year-old student from Vanderburg Elementary School died from flu-related symptoms.

ThestreetAnne Sraders  / Feb 8, 2019 
Social Security Spousal Benefits: What to Know and Eligibility in 2019
Navigating your various retirement options may seem like quite a task. With 401(k)s, 403(b)s, Roth IRAs and many more, planning for retirement may feel more exhausting than going to your 9-5. But, what about Social Security? Fortunately, Social Security provides benefits on your own record, but also offers spousal and survivor benefits.

Yahoo FinanceDaniel Howley / Feb 6, 2019
Easy ways to make your wedding ridiculously cheaper
Before my now-wife and I tied the knot last year, everything I’d ever heard about planning a wedding made it sound like an expensive nightmare. But it didn’t cost nearly as much as we anticipated. So how did we manage that? By following a few simple tips and, most importantly, staying positive.

CNBCSharon Epperson | Jessica Dickler  | Feb 9, 2019
Next government shutdown: How to build a cash cushion when your income is cut off
If there’s one thing the 35-day government shutdown made clear: Americans aren’t saving for a rainy day.
More than 75 percent of all workers say they’re living paycheck to paycheck.
Here are some easy steps to take to build your cash cushion to guard against an unexpected loss of income.

CNBCN. El-Bawab  / Feb 1, 2019 
Here’s one financial resolution people plan to keep in 2019
A new study from CompareCards.com shows that Americans are confident they will be able to pay off their monthly credit card bills a lot more often in 2019.  Seven out of 10 millennials said they anticipate fully paying off their monthly balances more often this year.  Maintaining a balance on your card could cost you.

Yahoo FinanceJeanie Ahn / Feb 1, 2019
Before you settle down with your Valentine, ask these tough money questions
Valentine’s Day is around the corner, which means a lot of diamond rings will be sliding onto fingers as it’s the second most popular day of the year to propose, according to Weddingwire.com, and 40% of engagements take place between Thanksgiving and Valentine’s Day.

GOBankingRatesMichiel Perry  | Feb 4, 2019
How to Decorate Your Home Like an Interior Designer With Thrift Store Finds
We have all spent hours pining over Pinterest boards, dreaming of the day we’ll have the house of our dreams. Unfortunately, we know the reality of our budget and how often that gets in the way of making our dreams a reality. A stylish home doesn’t have to break the bank, however.

Medical News TodaySusan Tompor  / Jan 29, 2019 
New federal income tax form may catch you by surprise. Here’s what you need to know
The best way to prepare to do your taxes – or even get your taxes done – is to take a deep breath, gather your thoughts and start scrambling for your paperwork. Your 2018 federal income tax return will be unlike much of what you’ve seen in the past. We’re looking at a wide array of major changes – and plenty of tripwires – under the new tax law. But some sensible, first steps can help you fight the anxiety and tackle your taxes.

YahooMarie Claire Dorking / Jan 29, 2019
Your toddler’s screen time could hinder their language and motor skills
Screen time is causing toddlers to lose coordination skills like those needed to tie their shoelaces, new research suggests.  The study of 2,400 children, published in the JAMA Paediatrics, found that more screen time was linked to lower scores in “milestone” tests of coordination, as well as communication, problem-solving and social skills.

Los Angeles TimesMelissa Healy | Jan 28, 2019
Obesity, climate change and hunger must be fought as one, health experts declare
Maybe, when it comes to finding a way out of a global crisis of obesity, we’re just thinking too small.  Maybe the steps needed to reverse a pandemic of unhealthy weight gain are the same as those needed to solve two other crises of human health: malnutrition and climate change.  So instead of trying to tackle each of these problems individually, public health experts recommend that we lash the three together.

MarketWatchBrett Arends / Jan 27, 2019 
Watch out for these 10 ‘retirement killers
There are plenty of things that can ruin a person’s retirement plans — divorce, illness, job loss, overspending. Some leave a retiree with a lifetime of regret. A recent study has revealed for the first time the 10 biggest causes of financial regret among those who have retired or are near to retirement. The information may help those who are currently working and saving, by giving them more ability to plan their finances and prepare.

USA TODAYJanna Herron and Susan Tompor | Jan. 25, 2019
Taxes 2019: When to file and what big changes to expect
Sitting down to do your taxes in the next few weeks – or talking with your tax preparer – will involve tackling the most sweeping changes in the federal income tax rules in more than 30 years.  You’ll need to keep in mind that more than 600 rule changes took place under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which was passed by Congress in late 2017.

CNBCCourtney Connley | Jan 27, 2019
8 companies offering work-from-home jobs that don’t require a college degree
In an effort to secure the best talent on the market, more and more companies are expanding their applicant pool to include professionals without a traditional college degree.

TheStreetEric Reed Jan | 25, 2019
What Is the Average Household Cost of Food in 2019?

Americans spend more on food than on almost any other line-item in the household budget. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, nationally we spend more than $7,700 per year on groceries and going out. For rural and suburban consumers it’s their third highest expense after housing and transportation. Urban residents spend more on food than anything aside from housing.

Money Talks NewsKarla Bowsher | Jan 25, 2019
Consumers Say These Vacuum Brands Are the Best
Here are the brands that vacuum owners themselves recently rated highest — and those to avoid.  Crazy as it sounds, shopping for a vacuum can require as many decisions as buying a car. In both cases, you must:

NerdWalletArielle O’shea | Jan 24, 2019
The Average 401(k) Balance by Age
A record number of 401(k) holders at Fidelity Investments hit millionaire status in 2018. Not one of them? You’re in very good company: A seven-figure 401(k) balance is the exception, not the rule.
In fact, the average 401(k) balance at Fidelity — which holds 16.2 million 401(k) accounts and is consistently ranked as the largest defined contribution record-keeper — was $106,500 as of September 2018.

AP NewsDayana Yochim Jan. 24, 2019
Could you live on your retirement savings for 23 years?
 
Precision isn’t always possible when it comes to retirement planning. That doesn’t mean you have to wing it and hope your savings don’t expire before you do.Looking at the income, living expenses and life spans of today’s retirees can help you make the right financial moves so your golden years aren’t tarnished by an unexpected shortfall.

U.S. News Ben Luthi | Jan. 25, 2019
When Should You Have Multiple Credit Cards?
When used responsibly, credit cards can help you manage expenses, establish a positive credit history, and take advantage of rewards and other benefits along the way. With so many different types of credit cards and card features available, it may make sense to carry more than one to maximize their value. Here’s what you should keep in mind if you want to add cards to your wallet.

USA TodayPeter Dunn | Dec. 7, 2018
Financial planning: How to meet your money goals in 2019
My brain goes through the exact same exercise around 5 p.m. every Dec. 31. As I don my tuxedo for a night of revelry – OK, fine, I’m usually in sweatpants settling in for a night of board games – I reflect back on the year that was.

U.S.NewsMaryalene LaPonsie Jan. 24, 2019
12 Tax Deductions That Disappeared This Year
THIS TAX-FILING SEASON, taxpayers are poised to experience the impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, which eliminated beneficial deductions and credits. Touted as the largest tax overhaul in 30 years, the law could be a mixed bag for many households as it increases the standard deduction and child tax credit, but makes more than a dozen deductions extinct.

USA TodayJanna Herron | Jan. 23, 2019
Your tax refund won’t be delayed by short-staffed IRS if you do these two things
You’ll likely get your refund on time even if the Internal Revenue is short-staffed of the government shutdown and no-shows among unpaid workers who are financially strained.  That’s because the tax process is largely automated for tax returns filed electronically and for refunds delivered by direct deposit, according to industry insiders. Only returns that trigger a review during the automated process could face delays. 

The Wall Street JournalPaul Ziobro | Jan. 23, 2019 
Amazon’s Pitch to Woo Shippers: Fewer Fees Than FedEx, UPS
Amazon.com Inc., which is rolling out its own delivery network, is trying to poach shippers from FedEx Corp. and United Parcel Service Inc. UPS -1.83% by targeting a common complaint: fuel surcharges and extra fees that drive up the cost of home deliveries.